Midwest Summer Institute

June 18-19, 2018, Cedar Falls, IA
University of Northern Iowa

Advocating for Access: The Right to Inclusion, the Right to Communication

Speakers

CHERYL M. JORGENSEN

woman in scarf smilingFrom 1985 until the spring of 2011, I was a faculty-researcher at the University of New Hampshire's Institute on Disability focusing on inclusive education for students with autism, intellectual, and other developmental disabilities. I'm now in semi-retirement and able to focus on the work about which I am most passionate. That includes student-specific consultation, team professional development, school-wide systems change, policy advocacy, and writing. I particularly like working with students with Down syndrome and their educational teams.


 

MARILYN CHADWICK

woman smilingFrom 1985 until the spring of 2011, I was a faculty-researcher at the University of New Hampshire's Institute on Disability focusing on inclusive education for students with autism, intellectual, and other developmental disabilities. I'm now in semi-retirement and able to focus on the work about which I am most passionate. That includes student-specific consultation, team professional development, school-wide systems change, policy advocacy, and writing. I particularly like working with students with Down syndrome and their educational teams.

 

 

 

 

PASCAL CHENG

man sitting in front of wretches and jabberers posterPascal Cheng has a M. Ed. and C.A.S. in Special Education from the University of Vermont and has worked for over 30 years with children and adults with developmental disabilities in school and community settings.

He currently works for the Howard Center in Burlington, Vermont as an educational and communication specialist, providing training and consultation in the areas of augmentative communication, assistive technology and literacy for children and adults with developmental disabilities. He has developed specific expertise in facilitated communication, an augmentative communication method for individuals with limited speech. Through his work with individuals served by the Howard Center and continued training at the Institute of Communication and Inclusion at Syracuse University, he has gained extensive skill and experience in the use of this method of communication. As part of a national network of Master Trainers in Facilitated Communication, he works as a consultant to schools and agencies and regularly participates as a trainer in local, regional and national workshops and conferences.

His professional associations involve membership on three different statewide committees: the Vermont Communication Task Force, the Vermont Autism Task Force, and the Vermont Assistive Technology Advisory Council.

DARLENE HANSON

smiling womanDarlene Hanson is a speech and language specialist with an expertise in working with individuals with severe communication impairments. She is the Director of Communication Services with REACH, in the Los Angeles area. Darlene has been working in this field for 24 years. Her work focuses on bringing alternate models of communication to those who do not use speech to communicate effectively. Darlene received her MA from Whittier College and her BA from Chapman College, both in Communication Disorders. She is recognized as a master trainer in Facilitated Communication. She participated in the writing of the Standards of Best Practice for Facilitated Communication from Syracuse University and has co-authored research on authorship for facilitated communication.

HARVEY LAVOY

man standing in front of body of waterHarvey F. Lavoy, III has worked for Community Developmental Services (CDS), a Division of Washington County Mental Health Services in Montpelier, Vermont since 1994.  He has a B.S. in Special Education and has worked in the field of Human Services since 1973.  
He currently is the Director of Communication Training and Resources at CDS and provides education, training and technical assistance to adults and children with complex communication needs as well as their families, support staff, educational teams, schools and agencies. He has been a member of the Vermont Statewide Communication Task Force since 2000 providing statewide trainings, workshops, and conferences to enable adults in Vermont with developmental disabilities to communicate, make social connections, and participate in community life more fully. 

He is a member of a National network of Master Facilitated Communication Trainers.  He received a Certificate of Recognition as a Master Trainer in Facilitated Communication in 2006 from the Institute on Communication and Inclusion, School of Education, Syracuse University and provides introductory and skill building training at the institute two to three times a year.

TRACY THRESHER

smiling man in hatTracy Thresher is a native Vermonter who lives and works in Vermont. Tracy began using Facilitated Communication in 1990 and was one of the first individuals with autism in Vermont to be introduced to it. He has presented at local, statewide and national workshops and conferences. He has consulted with local schools and also mentors high school students, is a member of the Vermont Autism Advisory & Planning Committee, the Vermont Communication Task Force, the WCMHS Communication Alliance, is a member of the Imagine the Future VT state Task Force and does freelance work for Green Mountain Self-Advocates and works with the Institute on Communication and Inclusion at Syracuse University as a Master Trainer. Tracy and his friend, Larry Bissonnette, travel promoting their documentary "Wretches & Jabberers" in an effort to change the World's view of disability to one of positivity.

Email: rightsrus@wcmhs.org

Blog: www.wretchesandjabberers.org/tracy